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See details for additional description. Skip to main content. We're sorry, something went wrong. Please try again. About this product. Stock photo. Brand new: lowest price The lowest-priced brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging where packaging is applicable. See details. See all 3 brand new listings. Buy It Now. Add to cart. Be the first to write a review. He does note they've had some local successes in resistance but that, in general, they've lost ground to the neoliberal machine.

Apr 14, Sally rated it really liked it Shelves: social-justice-action , economics. An investigative reporter gives a carefully fair yet damning appraisal of today's development programs, players and ideology. The book starts slowly and the style is somewhat convoluted, but stick with it; by the end the book makes clear the folly of today's de rigueur pollyannaish optimism, both about the possibility - even the inevitability - of eradicating hunger in the near future and about private sector corporations and charities as the best agents to disinterestedly and altruistically hel An investigative reporter gives a carefully fair yet damning appraisal of today's development programs, players and ideology.

The book starts slowly and the style is somewhat convoluted, but stick with it; by the end the book makes clear the folly of today's de rigueur pollyannaish optimism, both about the possibility - even the inevitability - of eradicating hunger in the near future and about private sector corporations and charities as the best agents to disinterestedly and altruistically help the poor and control the world's agriculture. The author doesn't impute motives to players on any side of the issues, but points out where the emperor has no clothes.

How, he asks, can you have a "partnership" when one side has all the money and power and no contractual obligation to follow through while the other side is legally bound to the terms of agreements? For example, the financial analysis of aid in and profit out of Africa is a strong indication of the colonial-like nature of relationships there.

I wasn't aware of how tightly interconnected the financial and corporate entities, philanthrocapitalists and NGOs in the development field are. I recommend this book. Nov 05, Sasha Alyson rated it it was amazing. The big money says "we can solve the problem of world hunger, just leave the details to us.

Trust us. How will they eliminate hunger? Lots of partnering. The partners won't be happy till every poor farmer borrows money to pay for their new improved seeds. And all the partners The big money says "we can solve the problem of world hunger, just leave the details to us. And all the partners come from wealthy countries, with occasional local elites getting a small role.

Thoroughly researched and adeptly linking many themes, reading The Reproach of Hunger is a bit like being wrapped in an intricate tapestry of nightmares. Quite intricate -- more than once, I got lost in a sentence.

But Rieff fills his sentences with intelligence and usually writes them with grace. While I don't always agree -- it seems to me that what he describes is colonialism, yet he won't use that word -- I appreciate his depth of research and his thoughtful perspective. I was sorry to see the book end.

The Reproach of Hunger: Food, Justice and Money in the 21st Century

Sep 01, Jan Peregrine rated it really liked it. While i did skim and even skip parts of this well-argued book, I'm a wiser person fog having read it. The author also points out that malnutrition is more of a problem because junk food is what the very poor can afford, as well as crave emotionally. Even if they have the money to buy produce and nutritious food, they prefer to While i did skim and even skip parts of this well-argued book, I'm a wiser person fog having read it.

Even if they have the money to buy produce and nutritious food, they prefer to eat comfort foods, which causes obesity. Rieff isn't too optimistic that our current food development and distribution system will change. It must be seen as a problem of political will and not one of traditional morality. Until that changes we will have starving and malnourished people as well as generations of children growing up mentally and physically underdeveloped. Very sad! There's a lot more to the book, such as his criticism of philanthrocapitalism whose proponents like Bill Gates believe that technological innovation will get rid of the hunger crisis in a couple of decades.

This may be helping the situation, he says, but the solution cannot be that simple because it's an emotional and political struggle as well.

Well worth checking out. View all 3 comments. Oct 11, Jacob rated it it was ok. This is some time-crunched grad student's awful fever dream, trying to flog pages of content into a page book. Okay that's uncharitable, but this is not easy to get through. There's a lot of fluff and general dead-horse-beating in which Rieff makes a point and then reinforces it and then does it again, and then returns to the point later in two chapters.

Like seriously, I am reading your bo This is some time-crunched grad student's awful fever dream, trying to flog pages of content into a page book. Like seriously, I am reading your book about food policy, I am not dumb, I got it the first time. Here's the major things he has to say: Aid Organizations Overpromise and Underperform The Millenium Development Goals adopted by the UN included eradicating hunger and extreme poverty by Well, that didn't exactly work out.

So what are our Sustainable Development Goals for ? Clearly this is possible in the stated time frame. On the one hand the grandiosity is contemptible but on the other it's hard to feel very scandalized, I mean, politicians and salespeople, lying about things, to get grant money?!

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The Reproach of Hunger by David Rieff | Penguin Random House Canada

By Jove. Food Security Is Not An Engineering Problem The world considered generally makes enough food for everyone to be able to eat a surplus of calories, and this has been true since like At this point it's not a question of improving yields or rolling out new technologies.


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But aid organizations and major donors keep talking about malnutrition like it will get solved if we just farm better. Or even more nebulously in the case of the Silicon Valley philanthrocapitalist crowd, technology itself will save the world. The world is better now than before we had computers, and so the world will keep getting better as our computers improve. It's more of an article of faith than an actual explanation of how things will get fixed.

Also for the actual real problems that do need to be solved, that's not sexy. For instance, no one in the aid community is talking about global warming. No one wants to run around screaming, and it's really depressing that the Sahara is going to get a lot bigger over the next 50 years.

The Reproach of Hunger: Food, Justice, and Money in the Twenty-First Century

And we don't have the political will to come even close to working on reversing that process. But it's totally ridiculous to say that we're going to engineer our way into having more food for enough people but ignore how much of the food-growing areas in the world are going to be underwater. Food Security Is A Moral Problem The real problem with the previous point isn't even so much that it's wrong so much as it obfuscates the real factors which lead to food insecurity.

If food is a commodity then the Martin Shkreli's of the world can cause the ultra-poor to go hungry by speculating on staple crops. Or if we find another brilliant non-food use for corn. Oil companies can spend more on ethanol than sub-Saharan Africans can on their staple crops. There are a lot of other complicating factors in very impoverished countries like political instability, which aid organizations are loath to address because the solutions are murky and any attempts risk coming off as paternalistic.

See also: birth control--one of the major factors in countries clawing their way out of food insecurity is readily available prophylaxis, but you can't make a strong stand for that because most of the affected people are black, and no one wants to be perceived as advocating eugenics. This is kind of the weakest section, which is unfortunate because it's probably the most interesting. Rieff touches on the fact that China and to a lesser extent India have managed to reframe food insecurity as a moral problem and make large steps to resolve it, but declines to go into much detail.

You get the feeling he is most interested in doing a critical review of aid literature, not actually discussing positive solutions. Foreign Aid Is Corporate Neocolonialism I don't think that this even fits into the thesis of his book but it's actually a perspective I haven't thought about much. Companies set up their operations in haven countries to shelter their tax burden, this much is obvious.

A fringe effect is that this leads to billions in revenue which is earned in third-world countries ends up just extracted. Gone to Ireland and the Canaries. London Waterloo. Royal Festival Hall. Account Services. Browse Menu:. Your Shopping Basket. Foyalty David Rieff.

The Reproach of Hunger: Food, Justice, and Money in the Twenty-First Century

Add to Basket. Leave Review. Author Info. Synopsis In the world's leaders and experts agreed that the eradication of hunger was the essential task for the new millennium. Delivery Delivery Options All delivery times quoted are the average, and cannot be guaranteed. You might also like. Democracy on Leave: How Dark Money, Carbon Criminals, Climate Crimes.

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